DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT


OFFICE OF SECRETARY

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

Appointed by the Governor with Senate advice and consent, the Secretary of the Environment heads the Department. The Secretary appoints the Deputy Secretary with the Governor's approval.

In addition to administrative responsibilities, the Secretary of the Environment (or the Secretary's designee) is authorized to subpoena any person or evidence, administer oaths, and take depositions and other testimony. The Secretary also investigates the influence of locality, employment, habit, and other conditions on health and researches the causes of diseases and mortality, to the extent that they may relate to environmental factors. To obtain information about causes and incidence of cancers, the Secretary may institute studies.

The Secretary serves on the Governor's Executive Council; the Smart Growth and Neighborhood Conservation Subcabinet; the Governor's Council on the Chesapeake Bay; the Chesapeake Bay Trust; the Implementation Committee of the Chesapeake Executive Council; the Governor's Flood Mitigation Task Force for Western Maryland; the Maryland Advisory Commission on Manufacturing Competitiveness; the Interdepartmental Advisory Committee for Minority Affairs; the Governor's Pesticide Council; the Scenic and Wild Rivers Review Board; and the State Soil Conservation Committee. The Secretary also is a member of the Task Force on the Environmental Effects of Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE); the Western Maryland Economic Development Task Force; and the Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities. In addition, the Secretary chairs the Asbestos Oversight Committee, co-chairs the Interagency Nutrient Reduction Oversight Committee, and serves on the Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission, the Ozone Transport Commission, and the Susquehanna River Basin Commission.

POLICY COORDINATION

Policy Coordination began in 1995. The Assistant Secretary for Policy Coordination advises the Secretary of the Environment and Deputy Secretary on policy for permit efficiency and regulatory streamlining, strategic planning and evaluation, and federal and State budget coordination. This office oversees audit services, legislation, the Environmental Permits Service Center, the Office of Budget, the Office of Communications, and the Smart Growth and Environmental Restoration Division.

ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITS SERVICE CENTER
The Environmental Permits Service Center organized in 1995 to simplify the permit process for businesses subject to environmental regulation. To safeguard the environment, the Department issues more than forty types of approvals, in the form of permits, licenses, or certifications, as required by law. Such approvals are issued to improve or maintain air and water quality; control sources of radiation; protect wetlands; manage mineral resources; and regulate wastes, particularly hazardous and toxic wastes.

Because some businesses require more than one permit and some permits require detailed scientific analysis, interjurisdictional review, or public hearings, the Center provides applicants with complete information on what permits they need and how to apply for them. The Center then tracks the progress of applications as they are reviewed, acted upon, and issued by departmental units.

To help new businesses locate in Maryland, the Center also works closely with the Department of Business and Economic Development. The Center's Small Business Assistance Program and Pollution Prevention Program both provide technical expertise to businesses. The Center also publishes the Business Guide to Environmental Permits and Approvals.

OFFICE OF BUDGET
The Office of Budget formed in 1995 to combine the functions of capital and operating budget management with those of bond sale and loan processing from the Water Quality Financing Administration. Under the Office are the Maryland Water Quality Financing Administration and two divisions: Capital Budget, and Operating Budget.

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS
The Office of Communications began in 1991 as the Office of Community Assistance. Under Policy Coordination, it became Public Information and Community Assistance in 1995 and was renamed the Office of Communications in 1996.

Responsible for media relations, the Office coordinates community outreach for the Department. As an ombudsman, the Office is the liaison between the Department and citizens, industry, local government, other State agencies, international contacts, nonprofit organizations, regional advisory councils, the media, environmental advocacy groups, local communities, and civic organizations. The Office informs the public about programs, permits, and regulations, and publicizes hearings open to citizens.

SMART GROWTH & ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION DIVISION
Formed in April 1999, the Smart Growth and Environmental Restoration Division oversees implementation of the Smart Growth Initiative and coordinates efforts to meet the goal of restoring 60,000 acres of wetlands.


ADMINISTRATIVE & EMPLOYEE SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

The Administrative and Employee Services Administration started as Finance and Administration and reorganized under its present name in 1995.

Under the Administration are five divisions: Central Services; Fiscal Services; Library Services; Personnel Services; and Safety Services and Facilities Management.


AIR & RADIATION MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

State concerns with air quality and the effects of radiation were evident by 1951 when the Division of Industrial Health and Air Pollution formed under the Bureau of Environmental Hygiene, Department of Health. In 1966, the work of monitoring and regulating was restructured. The Division of Air Quality Control was established within the Bureau of Resources Protection, and the Division of Radiological Health functioned under the Bureau of Consumer Protection. When the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was created in 1969, these divisions continued under the Environmental Health Administration. By 1977, under the Environmental Health Administration, Community Health Programs regulated the control of dangerous emissions from ionizing and nonionizing radiation sources, while Air Quality Programs developed air resource management plans. Air Quality Programs reorganized as the Air Management Administration by 1983 and, with the Division of Radiation Control of Community Health Programs, transferred to the Department of the Environment in 1987 (Chapter 306, Acts of 1987). In 1992, the Administration reformed as the Air and Radiation Management Administration to include the Radiological Health Program.

Programs for cleaner air are developed and implemented by the Air and Radiation Management Administration. The Administration monitors levels of ambient air pollutants across the State and devises plans to achieve and maintain air quality standards. To control air emissions, it makes and enforces regulations and issues permits that set emission standards for construction or operation of equipment that emits to the atmosphere. The Administration sets standards for and (with the Department of Transportation) manages the Motor Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program. The Administration also licenses asbestos removal contractors.

The Administration works through seven programs: Air Monitoring and Data Management; Air Quality Compliance; Air Quality Permits; Air Quality Planning; Asbestos and Industrial Hygiene; Mobile Sources Control; and Radiological Health. The Administration also is helped by the Air Quality Control Advisory Council and the Attainment Plan Task Force.

AIR MONITORING & DATA MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The Air Monitoring and Data Management Program was created in September 1988 as the Air Monitoring and Information Systems Program and received its present name in January 2000. The Program operates a statewide air sampling and monitoring network and collection stations for acid deposition. Regularly, the Program prepares air quality data reports and manages air data bases for other programs. The Program also conducts special sampling studies for toxics and other purposes.

AIR QUALITY COMPLIANCE PROGRAM


The Air Quality Compliance Program organized in September 1988 as the Enforcement Program. In 1995, it adopted its present name when it was placed under the Permits and Compliance Policy Office. The Program conducts inspections and enforces air pollution laws and regulations affecting industries that are major and technically demanding stationary sources of air pollution. The Program responds to all citizen complaints regarding air pollution and coordinates 24-hour responses of the Air and Radiation Management Administration.

AIR QUALITY PERMITS PROGRAM


In 1988, the Air Quality Permits Program began as the Air Toxics and New Source Permits Program. Reorganized under its present name in 1994, the Program was placed under the Permits and Compliance Policy Office in 1995. The Program works to ensure compliance with emission standards for toxic air pollutants. It reviews applications and issues permits for businesses to construct new industrial processes or modify existing ones that might become sources of air pollution. Permits also are issued to allow businesses to sell or burn waste oil with specified equipment.

Operating Permit Program. The Air Quality Permits Program also administers this program of the Air and Radiation Management Administration.

AIR QUALITY PLANNING PROGRAM

In 1988, the Air Quality Planning Program started as the Air Quality Policy, Planning, and Regulation Development Program and received its present name in 1994. The Program tracks State and federal laws and regulations pertaining to air quality. To control air pollutant emissions, the Program develops plans and regulations that help the State meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

ASBESTOS & INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE PROGRAM

The Asbestos and Industrial Hygiene Program was initiated in 1988 as the Community Environmental Services Program. It adopted its present name in 1994. The Program is responsible for State asbestos programs and enforces air quality standards for categories such as asphalt plants, quarries, special medical waste incinerators, and training for incinerator operators.

Program oversight extends to three divisions: Asbestos Accreditation and School Assistance; Asbestos Licensing and Enforcement; and Industrial Hygiene.

ASBESTOS ACCREDITATION & SCHOOL ASSISTANCE DIVISION
So that public and private schools can comply with federal and State regulations on asbestos, the Asbestos Accreditation and School Assistance Division provides them with technical assistance. The Division also regulates private sector asbestos trainers who provide the training required by law before individuals may engage in asbestos-related demolition, renovation, or encapsulation.

ASBESTOS LICENSING & ENFORCEMENT DIVISION
The Asbestos Licensing and Enforcement Division issues the asbestos contractor license, required by law since 1981 for any entity demolishing, renovating, or encapsulating any friable asbestos material (Chapter 695, Acts of 1981). The Division enforces the licensing requirement and all State and federal asbestos regulations.

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE DIVISION
In 1989, the Industrial Hygiene Division began as the Industrial Operations Program under the Toxics, Environmental Science and Health Administration of the Department of the Environment. The Program reorganized into a division under the Air and Radiation Management Administration in 1992 and was renamed the Industrial Hygiene Division in 1993.

For State agencies and facilities, local schools, and county health departments, the Division provides technical consultation on exposure to toxic substances and support for industrial hygiene. The Division identifies environmental hazards in State facilities; advises on management and control of these hazards; and oversees implementation of the programs of the Asbestos Oversight Committee, which is responsible for the management and removal of asbestos in all State facilities. The Division also trains and medically monitors all State employees who routinely work with asbestos.

MOBILE SOURCES CONTROL PROGRAM

The Mobile Sources Control Program formed in September 1988 to deal with mobile sources of air pollution. The Program sets standards for motor vehicle emissions and helps administer the Motor Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program.

Under the Mobil Sources Control Program are three divisions: Certification and Auditing; Engineering and Technology Assessment; and Inspection and Maintenance.

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH PROGRAM

The Radiological Health Program originated in 1959 as a radiation protection section of the Department of Health. By 1967, the section had evolved into the Division of Radiological Health. When Maryland became a party to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Agreement in 1971, the Division reorganized as the Division of Radiation Control within the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. In 1987, the Division joined the Department of the Environment as the Center for Radiological Health. The Center reformed in 1989 as the Radiological Health Program under the Toxics, Environmental Science and Health Administration. In 1992, the Program was placed under the Air and Radiation Management Administration.

All radiation sources in Maryland are regulated by the Radiological Health Program. The Program licenses users of radioactive material, registers facilities, and enforces regulations that cover both ionizing and nonionizing radiation sources, by-product material, and limited quantities of special nuclear material. For all radiological emergencies, including industrial, medical or transportation radiation accidents and serious incidents, the Program provides emergency response. It also conducts drills for nuclear emergencies at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant or Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (Code Environment Article, secs. 8-101 through 8-601).

Two divisions are overseen by the Program: Radiation Machines; and Radioactive Materials Licensing and Compliance. The Program is aided by the Radiation Control Advisory Board.

RADIATION MACHINES DIVISION
The Radiation Machines Division oversees the registration and inspection of facilities with radiation machines, including accelerator facilities; hospitals; offices of physicians, podiatrists, chiropractors, dentists, and veterinarians; and scientific, industrial and other institutions. The Division certifies medical, academic and industrial radiation machines as required by law and licenses private inspectors of x-ray machines. Staff inspect dental and veterinary radiation machines which are exempt from the certification requirement and, for the federal Food and Drug Administration, inspect mammography facilities and new x-ray machines.

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LICENSING & COMPLIANCE DIVISION
The Radioactive Materials Licensing and Compliance Division was first the Radioactive Materials Licensing, Compliance and Safeguards Division. It reorganized under its present name in January 1997. The Division licenses and inspects users of radioactive materials, such as hospitals, physicians, manufacturing and construction industries, radiographers, and other radioisotope users. The Division also provides emergency response in case of nuclear accident or other radiation emergency.


TECHNICAL & REGULATORY SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

In 1995, the Technical and Regulatory Services Administration formed. The Administration encompassed functions of former units, including Emergency Response and Enforcement Coordination; the Water Quality Program of the Water Management Administration; and the Water Quality Monitoring Program and the Environmental Assessment Program of the Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Management Administration.

The Administration provides technical and scientific analyses and data for departmental regulatory activities. It devises solutions to multimedia environmental problems, makes environmental risk assessments, and coordinates Department emergency responses. The Administration also maintains geographic information systems and the Toxics Inventory, does computer modeling of environmental conditions, and monitors shellfish waters for contaminants.

Under the Administration are the Office of Information Management and Technology, and four programs: Computer Modeling; Environmental Health and Risk Assessment; Environmental Planning and Analysis; and Field Operations.

COMPUTER MODELING PROGRAM

The Computer Modeling Program began in 1987 as the Division of Modeling and Analysis under the Planning and Evaluation Program of the Water Management Administration. By 1989, the Division reorganized as the Technical Support Division under the Chesapeake Bay and Special Projects Program. In 1991, it became the Modeling and Assessment Division and, in 1992, was placed under the Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Management Administration. In 1993, the Division was renamed the Mathematical Modeling Division under the Environmental Assessment Program, and in 1994 the Program itself was reconstituted as Mathematical Modeling and Information Systems Management. It became the Computer Modeling and Information Management Systems Program in 1995, and received its current name in 1999 when Information Management Systems transferred to the Office of Information Management and Technology.

Maryland's scientific database for water quality of the Chesapeake Bay, its tributaries, rivers, streams, lakes, and other waters within the State is managed by the Program. The Program develops and applies mathematical and other predictive models as the basis for Department water regulations and policy. In addition, the Program assesses water quality associated with channel dredging in Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & RISK ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

In 1985, the Environmental Health and Risk Assessment Program started as the Division of Standards and Certification within the Water Management Administration. In 1990, it was renamed the Water Quality Program; in 1991, the Water Quality Operation Program; and, in 1992, the Standards and Shellfish Sanitation Program. The Program regained its former name, the Water Quality Program, in 1992. It transferred to the Technical and Regulatory Services Administration in 1995 as the Environmental Risk Assessment Program, and became the Environmental Health and Risk Assessment Program in 1999.

By certifying the quality of water for the safe harvest of oysters and clams and establishing water quality standards for State waters, the Program protects public health. The Program monitors shellfish and fish tissues for contaminants; and studies water quality. To evaluate and reduce whole effluent toxicity, the Program oversees tests at municipal and industrial facilities and develops and promulgates regulations to protect the quality of groundwater and surface water. The Program operates through three divisions: Effluent Toxicity and Evaluation; Environmental Health and Standards; and Shellfish Certification.

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING & ANALYSIS PROGRAM

The Environmental Planning and Analysis Program was established in 1992 as the Office of Emergency and Enforcement Coordination. In 1994, it was renamed Emergency Response and Enforcement Coordination. It reorganized as the Emergency Operations and Technical Support Program under the Technical and Regulatory Services Administration in 1995, as the Emergency Operations Program in 1998, and as the Environmental and Emergency Planning Program in 1999. It reorganized under its current name in January 2001.

In response to environmental and other emergencies, the Program coordinates planning and action by local, State and federal governments in cooperation with the private sector. Three divisions carry out Program responsibilities: Ecological Assessment; Environmental Planning and Outreach; and Flood Hazardous Mitigation and Right-to-Know.

FIELD OPERATIONS PROGRAM

The Field Operations Program began as the Water Quality Monitoring Program. Under the Water Management Administration, it was restructured in 1990 and became part of the Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Management Administration in 1992. In 1994, it was renamed the Monitoring Program. As the Field Operations Program, it transferred to the Technical and Regulatory Services Administration in 1995.

The Program provides field support, on-site observations, water quality assessments, and data for the Water Management Administration and other Department units. The Program has three divisions: Compliance Monitoring; Emergency Response; and Water Quality Monitoring.

OFFICE OF INFORMATION MANAGEMENT & TECHNOLOGY

To consolidate information technology functions, the Office of Information Management and Technology was created under the Technical and Regulatory Services Administration in July 1999. By combining five information technology units from throughout the Department, the Office better uses resources, standardizes data and system development, and provides information technology support for Department objectives.


WASTE MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

Functions of the Waste Management Administration originated in 1912 with the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering in the Department of Health. In 1951, the Bureau became the Division of Sanitary Engineering under the Department's Bureau of Environmental Hygiene. Certain functions of the Division in 1966 were assigned to the Division of Solid Waste Disposal under the Bureau of Resources Protection. As the Division of Solid Wastes, the Division was placed under the Environmental Health Administration, when the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene formed in 1969. The Division was renamed the Division of Solid Waste Control by 1973 and assigned to Community Health Programs by 1977. Also under the Environmental Health Administration by 1977 was the Toxic Substances Control Program. Elements of these programs were combined by 1980 as the Waste Management and Enforcement Program of the Environmental Health Administration. The Program reorganized as the Waste Management Administration by 1982, became part of the Department of the Environment in 1987, and was renamed the Hazardous and Solid Waste Management Administration in 1988 (Chapter 306, Acts of 1987). It adopted its current name in 1992.

The Waste Management Administration provides for the safe collection and disposal of solid wastes. It regulates and inspects industrial facilities that treat wastewater, and controls the transport, storage, and disposal of hazardous substances.

Industrial wastes and designated hazardous substances may not be discharged or disposed of without a permit from the Waste Management Administration. The Administration conducts inspections to assure compliance with the conditions of permits, certifications, and licenses that have been issued and investigates reported water and pollution violations. Under the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Planning Act of 1976, it is the State agency designated to regulate hazardous substances (P.L. 94-580). The Planning, Recycling and Outreach Program leads State recycling initiatives.

Under the Administration are five programs: Environmental Restoration and Redevelopment; Hazardous Waste; Lead Poisoning Prevention; Oil Control; Planning, Recycling and Outreach; and Solid Waste.

ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION & REDEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

The Environmental Restoration and Redevelopment Program began in January 1989 as the Emergency Response Program. In 1992, the Program merged with four other units: the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program from the Waste Management Administration; and the Hazardous Materials Transport Division, Lead-in-Soil Project, and the Lead Poisoning Prevention Project of the Toxics, Environmental Science and Health Administration. From this merger, the Environmental Response and Restoration Program formed in 1992 under the Waste Management Administration. The Program restructured as the Environmental Restoration and Redevelopment Program in 1995.

At hazardous waste disposal sites, the Program investigates, assesses, and removes environmental and public health threats. The Program also oversees cleanup of State and federal Superfund sites.

The Program has three divisions: Brownfields and Voluntary Clean-up; Federal and National Priorities List (NPL) Superfund; and Site Assessment and State Superfund.

HAZARDOUS WASTE PROGRAM

In 1977, the Hazardous Waste Program formed as the Toxic Substances Control Program under the Environmental Health Administration of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Duties of the Program were assigned to the Waste Management and Enforcement Program by 1980 and to the Waste Management Administration of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene by 1982. They transferred to the Department of the Environment in 1987.

The Hazardous Waste Program issues permits to and certifies all who generate, treat, store, dispose of, or transport hazardous waste in the State. The Program certifies haulers of hazardous waste and drivers of vehicles that transport hazardous waste. In 1993, the Program became responsible statewide for managing the generation, storage, and removal for disposal of low-level nuclear waste.

Three divisions constitute the Program: Hazardous Waste Compliance; Regulations and Permitting; and Tracking and Hazardous Materials Transportation.

TRACKING & HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION DIVISION
The Tracking and Hazardous Materials Transportation Division organized as the Toxics Information and Operations Center. The Center reorganized as the Toxics Registries and Analysis Program in 1989, the Toxic Registries Division in 1992, and the Tracking and Toxics Inventory Division in 1993. The Division reformed under its present name in 1995.

Under the federal Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act, the Division receives and stores information about the use of toxics by industry. The Division serves as a central repository for this data which Maryland counties use to develop emergency response plans.

The ecological effects of toxics, primarily on the aquatic environment, are assessed by the Division. These assessments are used by the Department and local agencies. In addition, the Division assists the Department of State Police and the Department of Transportation with commercial vehicle safety and the transport of hazardous materials.

OIL CONTROL PROGRAM

The Oil Control Program started in November 1988 as the Industrial Discharge Program under the Hazardous and Solid Waste Management Administration. In 1992, it reorganized by its current name under the Waste Management Administration.

All oil-related regulatory programs within the State are administered by the Oil Control Program. The Program regulates all aboveground and underground oil storage facilities, oil-contaminated soil facilities, and oil transportation. It trains tank removal personnel and oversees the maintenance, operation, and removal of underground storage tanks.

Program functions are carried out by the Office of Resource Management, and two divisions: Compliance and Remediation; and Permits and Support.

LEAD POISONING PREVENTION PROGRAM

The Lead Poisoning Prevention Program was created in 1994 and placed under the Planning and Resource Management Program which became the Regulatory and Technical Assistance Program in 1995 (Chapter 114, Acts of 1994).

In Sept. 2000, the Regulatory and Technical Assistance Program reorganized as the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. All functions not related to lead poisoning prevention were dispersed.

Under the Program are three divisions: Lead Accreditation and Oversight; Lead Enforcement; and Lead Surveillance and Health.

ENVIRONMENTAL LEAD DIVISION
The Lead Accreditation and Oversight Division emerged as the Lead Compliance Division of the Environmental Response and Restoration Program. As the Environmental Lead Division it moved to the Regulatory and Technical Assistance Program in 1995.

In residential and child-care structures, the Division enforces Maryland's lead paint regulations and abatement procedures. In 1993, it began to accredit persons providing lead paint abatement services and enforce regulations governing that accreditation (Code Environment Article, secs. 6-1001 through 6-1005).

LEAD SURVEILLANCE & HEALTH DIVISION
Origins of the Lead Surveillance and Health Division trace to the Division of Environmental Disease in the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Maryland's initiative for lead poisoning prevention moved to the Department of the Environment in 1987 and, by 1988, was under the Center for Special Toxics. As the Lead Poisoning Prevention Division, it was placed under the Toxics Operations Program in 1989, and as the Lead Coordination Program, under Environmental Health Coordination in 1992. In 1995, it became the Lead Coordination Division under the Regulatory and Technical Assistance Program. When that Program reorganized in Sept. 2000 as the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, the Division received its present name.

The Division investigates incidents of lead poisoning, particularly in children. It maintains registries of lead poisoning cases; works with county health departments to coordinate testing and reporting of childhood occurrences; educates health care providers and the public about lead poisoning; and staffs the Lead Poisoning Prevention Commission.

SOLID WASTE PROGRAM

The Solid Waste Program was initiated under the Waste Management Administration in March 1992. The Program issues construction and operation permits for all facilities that accept solid waste. These include sanitary landfills, processing facilities, transfer stations, incinerators, and resource recovery plants. The Program also issues permits for sewage sludge use and disposal. In addition, all county plans for solid waste management and recycling are reviewed by the Program.

Under the Program are three divisions: Compliance Enforcement and Data Management; Design and Certification; and Field Operations and Projects.


WATER MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATION

2500 Broening Highway
Baltimore, MD 21224

In Maryland, State responsibility for overseeing public water supplies first was assigned in 1912 to the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering within the Department of Health. In 1951, the Bureau reorganized as the Division of Sanitary Engineering under the Bureau of Environmental Hygiene, Department of Health. In 1966, the Division of Water Supply and Sewage Disposal formed as part of the Bureau of Resources Protection, Department of Health. When the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was created in 1969, the Division became the Division of Water and Sewerage under the Environmental Health Administration. By 1977, the Division's work continued as the Water Sewerage Control Program and, by 1982, reorganized as the Water Management Administration. From the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the Administration moved to the Department of the Environment in 1987 (Chapter 306, Acts of 1987). In 1995, certain functions of the Water Resources Administration of the Department of Natural Resources transferred to the Water Management Administration, including programs for mining, dam safety, and wetlands and oversight of the State Water Quality Advisory Committee (Chapter 488, Acts of 1995).

The Water Management Administration works through six programs: Mining; Nonpoint-Source; Wastewater Permits; Water Quality Infrastructure; Water Supply; and Wetlands and Waterways. Supporting Administration programs are two offices: Compliance Policy and Management; and Operational Services and Administration. The Administration also is aided by the State Water Quality Advisory Committee.

OFFICE OF COMPLIANCE POLICY & MANAGEMENT

The Office of Compliance Policy and Management originated in 1988 as the Compliance Program. It was renamed the Inspection and Compliance Program in 1992. Enforcement functions from the Water Resources Administration of the Department of Natural Resources were added to the Program in 1995. The Program reformed in 1996 as the Office of Compliance Policy and Management.

To ensure compliance with permits and other authorizations, the Office of Compliance Policy and Management inspects coal and noncoal surface mining, gas and oil-well drilling, and tidal and nontidal wetlands and waterways projects. It inspects dams and projects operating under a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. By inspection, the Office enforces approved plans to control sediment and manage stormwater at all State and federal construction projects. The Office also enforces approved sediment control plans on all private construction projects unless enforcement has been delegated to local government.

OFFICE OF OPERATIONAL SERVICES & ADMINISTRATION

The Office of Operational Services and Administration started as the Office of Administrative Services and reorganized under its present name on September 1, 1997.

The Office is responsible for the Administrative Services Division, and three regulatory boards: the State Board of Environmental Sanitarians; the State Board of Waterworks and Waste Systems Operators; and the State Board of Well Drillers.

MINING PROGRAM

The Mining Program oversees two divisions: Coal Mining; and Minerals, Oil and Gas. It is assisted by the Aggregates Mining Advisory Council and the Land Reclamation Committee.

COAL MINING DIVISION
160 South Water St.
Frostburg, MD 21532

In 1876, the Coal Mining Division began as the Bureau of Mines when the Governor first appointed a mine inspector for Allegany and Garrett counties. By 1916, the State Board of Labor and Statistics named the inspector with the Governor's approval. The Bureau of Mines organized in 1922 as a unit of the Department of Labor and Statistics (Chapter 307, Acts of 1922). In 1941, the Bureau transferred to the Department of Geology, Mines, and Water Resources. In 1964, the Bureau was made part of the Maryland Geological Survey (Chapter 73, Act of 1964). The Bureau was placed under the Energy and Coastal Zone Administration in 1976, and in 1979 under the Energy Administration of the Department of Natural Resources (Chapter 320, Acts of 1976). The Bureau, in 1987, became part of the Water Resources Administration. In 1995, the Bureau transferred to the Department of the Environment and reorganized as the Coal Mining Division of the Mining Program in the Water Management Administration.

The Coal Mining Division is responsible for environmental control of active coal mines and restoration of abandoned coal mines. For proposed coal and noncoal mines, the Division evaluates mining and reclamation plans. Environmental controls are established and reclamation plans for the land are approved before mining can begin. In addition, legislation now makes it possible to restore abandoned mines. These for decades have posed serious environmental problems. Reclamation fees and federal grants pay for this restoration (Code Environment Article, secs.15-201 through 15-203).

Under the Division are two sections: Permitting; and Land and Water Restoration.

MINERALS, OIL & GAS DIVISION
The Minerals, Oil and Gas Division developed within the Department of Natural Resources as the Surface Mining Division under the Water and Wetlands Program of the Water Resources Administration. In 1992, it reorganized under its present name and transferred to the Bureau of Mines. In 1995, under the Mining Program, the Division joined the Department of the Environment.

The permit application process for both noncoal surface mining and the development of oil and gas resources is overseen by the Division. These permits require posting a bond, allowing opportunity for public comment, ensuring public safety, controlling environmental impact, and having an approved reclamation or site stabilization plan. The Division reviews permit applications, conducts site inspections, and determines which applications meet the requirements.

NONPOINT-SOURCE PROGRAM

The Nonpoint-Source Program began in 1988 as the Policy and Evaluation Program. It became the Nonpoint-Source Permits Program in 1992 when the Sediment and Stormwater Administration merged with the Water Management Administration. The Program adopted its present name in 1997.

Nonpoint sources are those without a specific point of discharge. They include pollutants washed off streets or farmlands. To control nonpoint sources of pollution, the Program develops policy, regulations, and training programs.

Local programs for sediment control and stormwater management are overseen by the Program which delegates to local jurisdictions the authority to enforce erosion and sediment controls. At the same time, the Program reviews sediment control and stormwater management plans for State and federal construction projects. To municipalities with populations over 100,000, it issues National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits to discharge stormwater.

Under the Program are three divisions: Dam Safety; Program Review; and Sediment and Stormwater Plan Review.

DAM SAFETY DIVISION
The Dam Safety Division traces its origins to the Water Resources Commission which began regulating the construction and repair of dams in 1933. This division formerly had been in the Department of Natural Resources under the Water and Wetlands Program of the Water Resources Administration. In 1995, the Division transferred to the Department of the Environment under the Nonpoint-Source Permits Program of the Water Management Administration.

To ensure the safety of dams, the Division inspects dams, including those under construction. It issues permits to build or modify dams; conducts hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for new dam permit applications; and prepares downstream warning plans and "danger-reach" delineations for high-hazard dams.

WASTEWATER PERMITS PROGRAM

In the 1995 restructuring of the Department of the Environment, the Wastewater Permits Program was created as the Water and Wastewater Permits Program to streamline the permitting process. The Program assumed its current name in 1999 when the Water Rights Division moved to the Water Supply Program.

The Wastewater Permits Program encompasses three divisions: Industrial Discharge Permits; State Groundwater Permits; and Surface Discharge Permits.

INDUSTRIAL DISCHARGE PERMITS DIVISION
The Industrial Discharge Permits Division derives from the Water Quality Permits Section within the Department of Natural Resources which by 1972 was issuing industrial wastewater discharge permits. By 1981, this function shifted to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene as the Industrial Waste Division of the Waste Management Administration. When the Waste Management Administration moved to the newly created Department of the Environment in 1987, the Division became the Industrial Point Source Control Division. In 1992, it transferred to the Water Management Administration and adopted its current name.

The Division issues the surface water discharge permit required for all industrial, commercial or institutional facilities that discharge wastewater directly into State surface waters. This permit ensures that discharges meet State water quality standards and federal effluent guidelines.

STATE GROUNDWATER PERMITS DIVISION
Functions of the State Groundwater Permits Division started in 1945 when the Department of Geology, Mines, and Water Resources first issued permits to construct wells. The Maryland Geological Survey assumed duties of the Department in 1964. By 1972, these responsibilities transferred to the Water Resources Administration of the Department of Natural Resources, and then to the Office of Environmental Programs of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in 1980. These duties were assigned to the Department of the Environment in 1987. The Individual Septics and Wells Program was created in 1990 and reformed as the State Groundwater Permits Division in 1995.

To protect groundwater and public health, the Division implements State regulations concerning wells, septic systems, and subdivisions. It supplies technical assistance, training programs, and grants to local governments, communities, and property owners. The Division also helps install innovative disposal systems in areas where septic systems will not function. Its functions are carried out by three sections: Groundwater Discharge; Groundwater Protection; and Innovative and Alternative Septic Systems.

WATER QUALITY INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM

The Water Quality Infrastructure Program began in 1990 as the Capital Projects Administration. It was renamed the Capital Projects Program in 1992 and reorganized as the Water Quality Infrastructure Program in 1996.

Within the Water Management Administration, the Program is responsible for project development of all capital programs. To improve water quality, the Program helps local governments secure funding and plan, design, and construct capital projects, such as water and wastewater treatment plants, collection and distribution systems, and pumping stations. The Program works through six fund sources: the Biological Nutrient Removal Cost-Share Program; the Maryland Water Quality Revolving-Loan Fund; the Small Creeks and Estuaries Restoration Cost-Share Program; the Stormwater Pollution Control Cost-Share Program; the Supplemental Assistance Program; and the Water Supply Financial Assistance Program.

The Program also maintains a tracking system for Department capital projects, reviews and approves county water and sewer plans, and administers grant and loan payments and engineering contracts of projects funded by the Program.

WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM

Created in 1988, the Water Supply Program became the Public Drinking Water Program on July 1, 1993 and reverted to its original name in 1999. The Program sets and enforces drinking water standards by inspecting water treatment plants and distribution systems. It surveys drinking water systems to determine levels of nitrates, lead, volatile synthetic or organic chemicals, and other contaminants.

Under the Program are four divisions: Engineering and Technical Assistance; Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Implementation; Source Protection and Administration; and Water Rights.

WATER RIGHTS DIVISION
The Water Rights Division was initiated in the Department of Natural Resources under the Water Resources Administration. In 1995, the Division moved to the Department of the Environment under the Water and Wastewater Permits Program of the Water Management Administration.

To meet the increasing needs of Maryland water users, the Water Rights Division regulates the withdrawal and use of surface and groundwater. The Division requires a permit to withdraw water from the ground, rivers, or Chesapeake Bay. (A permit is not required for farm use of less than 10,000 gallons a day, or home uses other than heating and cooling.) The Division reviews permit applications to assure that the amount of water withdrawn is reasonable; will not create problems for other users; and will not harm the resource. The Division also develops management plans for the water resources of a region, county, or town and provides detailed information about available groundwater and surface water for a specific area.

WETLANDS & WATERWAYS PROGRAM

Within the Department of Natural Resources, the Wetlands and Waterways Program started in 1972 in the General Permits Section of the Water Resources Administration. By 1987, it had become the Water Management Program. The Program was renamed in 1990 as the Water and Mineral Management Program and, in 1993, as the Water and Wetlands Program. When it transferred to the Department of the Environment in 1995, the Program reorganized as the Wetlands and Waterways Program.

The Program protects and manages Maryland's tidal and nontidal wetlands and waters. Besides its regulatory functions, the Program also creates, restores, and enhances nontidal wetlands and streams; provides training and technical assistance to local jurisdictions and private organizations; and helps develop watershed management plans.

Three divisions comprise the Program: Coastal Zone Consistency; Nontidal Wetlands and Waterways; and Tidal Wetlands.

COASTAL ZONE CONSISTENCY DIVISION
To ensure consistency with the State's Coastal Zone Management Program, the Coastal Zone Consistency Division evaluates proposed federal acts that affect Maryland's coastal zone. Acts reviewed include direct federal actions, federal licenses and permits, and financial assistance to State and local governments.

NONTIDAL WETLANDS & WATERWAYS DIVISION
Formerly under the Department of Natural Resources, the Nontidal Wetlands and Waterways Division joined the Department of the Environment in 1995. The Division oversees the permit process for construction projects affecting nontidal wetlands, such as swamps, bogs, marshes, bottomlands, and woodlands, their buffer zones, and nontidal waterways, including the 100-year flood plain. To streamline permitting, the water quality certification required under the federal Clean Water Act is now part of the Division's permit process.

TIDAL WETLANDS DIVISION
The Tidal Wetlands Division transferred from the Department of Natural Resources to the Department of the Environment in 1995. To minimize damage to tidal wetlands, the Division provides advice and issues permits for all construction projects that affect areas subject to the rise and fall of the tides.

Maryland Constitutional Offices & Agencies
Maryland Departments
Maryland Independent Agencies
Maryland Executive Commissions, Committees, Task Forces, & Advisory Boards
Maryland Counties
Maryland Municipalities
Maryland at a Glance


Maryland Manual On-Line

Search the Manual
e-mail: mdmanual@mdarchives.state.md.us

 Maryland Manual On-Line, 2001

April 1, 2001   
Note: In this past edition of Maryland Manual, some links are to external sites.  View the current Manual


[ Archives' Home Page  ||  All About Maryland  ||  Maryland Manual On-Line  ||  Reference & Research
||  Search the Archives   ||  Education & Outreach  ||  Archives of Maryland Online ]

Governor     General Assembly    Judiciary     Maryland.Gov

Copyright April 10, 2001 Maryland State Archives